Useful Readings

Opportunity Information
The Effects of Entrainment of Fish in Water Diversions and Canals on Bow River Sport Fish Populations

Opportunity Notice: The Effects of Entrainment of Fish in Water Diversions and Canals on Bow River Sport Fish Populations

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NEWS ARTICLE
Protecting the health of Alberta’s Bow River

Here, beside the Bow River, it is possible to see for a century. In a special room at the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies, an exhibition called “Legacy in Time” features the landscape photographs of the Vaux family – 100 years apart. In the years leading up to the First World War, Philadelphia siblings Mary Vaux, George Vaux IX and William S. Vaux spent their holidays photographing glaciers throughout the Canadian mountain range. A century later, George’s grandson, Henry Vaux, Jr., began shooting the same scenes for comparison.

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TECHNICAL REPORT
Trout Stream Enhancement Studies: Synopsis of Information on Irrigation Diversion Fish

There is little quantitative data available in Idaho to assess the population effects of resident game fish losses to irrigation diversions, or even to determine whether a widespread problem exists. This report provides a synopsis of existing data on irrigation diversion losses that will help direct future investigations. Factors that contribute to fish loss include physical characteristics of diversions, headgate manipulation, natural phenomena, and fish behavior. Irrigation practices that result in host stream disturbances also potentially impact fish populations. Irrigation operations appear to primarily impact juvenile fish and may limit recruitment; the mechanisms may express themselves directly through losses to diversions and/or indirectly through habitat perturbations in host streams. If resident game fish losses to irrigation diversions are significant, mitigation methods that are cheaper than those currently being used will be required. Implementation of these methods will require instream habitats capable of supporting recovered fish stocks.

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TECHNICAL REPORT
Hydraulics Lab - Manuals: Fish Protection

This chapter provides an overview of fish exclusion options and related issues at water diversions. It gives direction to selection of appropriate concepts to pursue through the planning and design process. The need for and importance of fish protection has been presented in previous chapters. The planning and design process for fish exclusion has also been briefly presented. Exclusion barriers for upstream migrating fish is covered in chapter VIII.

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ARTICLE
Irrigation Canals and Fish.

FOR DECADES WE'VE KNOWN THAT irrigation canals can rob trout streams of water; we're just now beginning to understand the degree to which irrigation canals can rob trout, salmon, and steelhead streams of fish. In many parts of western North America, water for irrigation is taken from the nearest available source. Though lakes and reservoirs are used, streams and rivers are often preferred because they flow through a great spectrum of land, stretching like veins from mountain sources through the arid farmland of the foothills and Western prairie. At numerous locations along its journey, water is diverted out of streambeds into canals where it becomes available to irrigators. Unfortunately, many of the streams used for irrigation are home to resident trout, or routes to spawning areas for anadromous fish such as steelhead and Pacific salmon. The familiar problem posed to sport-fish streams by the irrigation industry is simple: Fish and agriculture both need water. Unfortunately, agriculture needs water most during hot, dry summers when streams have the least water to give. If too much water is removed from the stream, what remains gets too warm, resulting in dissolved oxygen deficiencies and possible fish-kills. Many of western North America's best known streams have faced this problem, including the Big Hole, Beaverhead, and Gallatin rivers in Montana; the Big Wood River and Silver Creek in Idaho; and the Oldman and Bow rivers in Alberta.

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PUBLICATION
Fish Protection at Water Diversions

The purpose of this manual is to provide design guidance for fish protection at small dams and water diversion structures by providing fish exclusion alternatives. This manual is addressed to the water user community involved in assessing, recommending, and designing appropriate fish exclusion facilities at water diversion structures. This manual focuses on Bureau of Reclamation’s (Reclamation) fish exclusion experience for water resources projects, presenting design methods and operation standards developed and used in recent years. Fish protection, exclusion and bypass at water diversions and other facilities will be the major theme covered in this first volume. A second volume is envisioned covering fish passages using fish ladders, including upstream and downstream passage for adult and juvenile fish passage structures; improvements in reservoir and river operations for control of temperature and dissolved gases, and habitat enhancement.

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NEWS ARTICLE
Alberta eyes another blockbuster irrigation project

The east side of Alberta could see revolutionary change if a $1.3-billion plan to irrigate 108,000 acres in the Special Areas and Municipal District of Acadia moves ahead. “Special Areas has everything it needs to become a highly productive agricultural area – everything except a reliable supply of water,” Jordon Christianson, chair of the Special Areas board, said in a Dec. 5 news release. “This project could reinvent what agriculture looks like in east-central Alberta, bringing new opportunities to producers passionate about agriculture.” A preliminary report released with little fanfare in late August backed that view, saying there is enough water available in the Red Deer River to irrigate 108,000 acres in the region. But it comes with a steep price tag.

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PUBLICATION
Alberta Irrigation Information 2022

The purpose of this publication is to provide a statistical overview of irrigation information and data primarily relating to the irrigation districts situated in Alberta, but also includes information about irrigation across the whole province. The majority of the annual data are provided by the Alberta irrigation districts. This publication is issued under the Open Government Licence – Alberta (http://open.alberta.ca/licence). Please note that the terms of this licence do not apply to any third-party materials included in this publication.

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MULTIPLE ARTICLES
BRID Annual Reports

Bow River Irrigation District (BRID) annual reports. Financial statements and Annual Reports for the Bow River Irrigation District (BRID) from the year 2013 onward.

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NEWS ARTICLE
Alberta's Oldman River: An Abundance of Trout Water in a Dramatic Setting

In the world of trout streams, Alberta's Oldman River is like Miss Universe's gorgeous little sister no press agent, no publicity, and not much fame in spite of its own eminent qualifications. The Oldman is overshadowed by not only one, but two of its kin: the Bow, which receives most of the adoration that leaks across the 49th parallel, and the Crowsnest, an Oldman tributary that gets the rest. Had Mother Nature not put these other rivers in the show, the Oldman would be the star. Fascination with this river comes easily, and for compelling reasons: a diverse and dramatic setting on the edge of the Rocky Mountains, a stunning abundance of trout water nearly 100 miles all told and a satisfying variety of fish and water types within that space.

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  • Fabio Henao Caviedes
    published this page in Resources 2023-10-13 08:39:49 -0600